Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Irish army photo study

I have to share some photos of the finished Irish lads. One of my goals was to ensure that the different unit types were easily recognized. I differentiated them with figure selection, paint job, and base compostion.  I made skirmishing (S) kerns four figures from a limited pose, light foot (FL) kerns six figures from a limited pose, bonnauchts (also FL) 8 figures from a diverse pose, and nobles (also FL) 9 figures from a diverse pose selection.  I composed the nobles from my choice for best painted in the army.
S kerns in forground, FL kerns middle, FL nobles center rear, and bonnauchts outside rear
S kerns front, FL kerns middle, FL bonnauchts left rear and FL nobles right rear

S kerns front, FL kerns middle, FL nobles left rear and FL bonnauchts right rear
I've painted six noble units, 12 bonnaucht units, 6 FL kerns, 6 S kerns, 2 S slingers and 2 S bows.  A sampling of the bonnauchts and kerns follows.


 Some rear views are shown below.



My favorite lads, those who made the grade as best painted, formed parade for a photoshoot.  The results follow.






That's all for now!  I intend to post an AAR of the Irishmen's first engagement with the Vikings and a photo-review of my Saxon army soon.  The Saxon's are currently undergoing the same rear-stand rebasing for the deep units the Vikings underwent.

11 comments:

  1. Those look great. I'm currently painting my own Crusader Irish (although mine are based for skirmish games). They are nice minis.

    Where did you get the really nice celtic cross flags? I'd love to have a couple of those to inspire the lads in their battles against the foreigners (or the petty king across the vale)

    Brian

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  2. The flags are from Little Big Man Studios. I began using them this past year, and am very happy with them. LBMS also do shield transfers -- I couldn't figure out if he makes any for the smaller shields the Crusader Irish figures have so I didn't use any on my guys, but I have some and they look very good. The "Who will you send against me now?" diorama on my site does use the LBMS shield transfers.

    And thank you very much for the complements -- I really appreciate them.

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  3. Excellent looking army, great work

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  4. Those are marvellous! So the shields are freehand? Can I be cheeky and ask how you get such good colour definition? For eg. the white horse on the green shield doesn't look to be black-lined, but the figure is very crisp and stands out.

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    1. The key is to put down your design, and thn go back with the background shield color and clean up any design color borders -- that way you have very crisp and pure colors, and clean edges.

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  5. @ FMB - The key is to put down your design, and thn go back with the background shield color and clean up any design color borders -- that way you have very crisp and pure colors, and clean edges.

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  6. Brent fantastic collection, I am just embarking on a new porkect for the Elizabethan wars and your pic's will spure me on. Would I be right in thinking you are using Gripping Beast?
    Cheers
    Stuart

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  7. Hi Stuart. There are a few Gripping Beast figures, but the army is primarily Crusader miniatures.

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  8. Blimey.

    Now that is an impressive army. Do you have a comparison shot between a crusader figure and a gripping beast figure?

    Im looking into the dark ages as a possible "next" project, and im inspired!!

    Thanks
    Steve

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  9. Thank you so much, Steve.

    I'll see if I can't post a series of close-ups comparing the two soon. As an aside, I liked painting the Crusader figures more than the Gripping Beast. I found the Gripping Beast didn't really come alive until they were close to done, while the Crusader looked good from the start. Of course, YMMV ;^)

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